The Origin of Decimal System in India – Part 1

We take a short break from our regular presentation of ‘Word Origins’ to present this special article.

Word Origins will be back very soon.

The Origin of Decimal System in India

Part 1

Copyright © 2007 by Rangi Ranganath

rangiranganath@yahoo.com

The decimal system is based on a ten-number system from zero to nine. The word decimal derives from the union of Indian Sanskrit dasha ‘ten’ and English numeral which means ‘symbol representing a number’. English numeral derives from Arabic nummee ‘coin’ which becomes Latin nummus ‘coin’ and German die Nummer ‘number’.

Other languages follow Indian Sanskrit dasha ‘ten’.

In India 

Indian Hindi/Urdu das ‘ten’

Thein all above Indian languages is pronounced as soft d as in this.

Greek pronounciation of d is the same.

 

All the following words uttered outside India mean ‘ten’ or ‘related to ten’ as shown. 

 Russian desyat

Spanish diez

Latin decem

English prefixes deca-, dece- and deci- ‘related to ten’

Polish dziesiec

French dix

Greek deka

How Indian s/sh sounds  become Latin and Greek k sound will be explained a little later in this part of the article.

Thus deci (from Indian Sanskrit dasha) + English part mal (from numeral from Arabic nummee,

Latin nummus and German die Nummer) = English decimal

 

Indian Sanskrit dasha modified as dec is present in all the major languages of the world.

Examples

c has mostly and sometimes k sounds.

Latin December, tenth and final month of the old Roman calendar

In 45 B.C. it was replaced by the Julian calendar with 12 months and 365 days.

See also Some Interesting Historical and Linguistic Facts at the end of this part

to see how September, October and November have Indian origins.

Latin decempeda ‘ten-foot measuring rod’

Indian Sanskrit paadah means ‘foot’.

Latin decempedator ‘surveyor who uses the decempeda’

Latin decemplex ‘ten-fold’ 

Latin decemcalmus ‘having ten lowrocks’

A lowrock is a device to hold the oars in place in a row boat. It is also called an oarlock.

Latin decemprimi ‘ten chief men in the senate of a municipality or colony’

Latin decemvir ‘ten magistrates in Rome’

Latin decemviralis ‘relating to the decemvir’

Latin decemviratus ‘office of the decemvir

English and Latin deci-, combination form meaning ‘one tenth’

English decibel, unit of sound, one tenth of a bel

English decile, statistical term dividing a population into ten equal groups

English deciliter, one tenth of a liter

English decimal 

English decimal fraction

English decimal place

English decimal point

English decimal system

English decimalize

English decimalization

English decimate ‘kill one in ten’

English decimate comes from the ancient Roman custom of killing one in ten soldiers of a mutinous legion.

Due to massive ignorance decimate means ‘mass killing’ today.

English be decimated

English decimation 

English decimeter, unit of distance, ‘one tenth of a meter’

English decimetric

Latin decimus ‘tenth’

Latin decimat ‘taken as a tenth’

Often Indian or other s/sh sounds become k sound in Greek and Latin.

Examples

Indian sitaar ‘long stringed instrument’, Greek kithara, guitar, ‘short stringed instrument’

Indian Sanskrit ashva ‘horse’, Latin equus ‘horse’

 English citron (pronounced as sitron), Greek kitron

English cellar (pronounced as sellar), Greek kelari

English cinematography (pronounced as sinematography), Greek kinimatografos

The following words mostly use c as k sound and sometimes as s sound.

English deca-, combination form meaning ‘ten’

English decade ‘period of ten years’

English decagon ‘geometrical figure with ten sides’

English decagonal ‘ten-sided’

English decagram ‘ten grams’

English decahedron ‘solid shape with ten faces’

English decaliter ‘ten liters’

English Decalogue ‘Ten Commandments’

English Decameron ‘hundred tales told by ten men in ten days about their fleeing from the Black Death’

English decameter ‘ten meters’

English decan ‘equal ten-degree division of  a sign of the zodiac’

English decasyllabic ‘ten-syllable metric line’

English decatherm, unit of heat, 1,000,000 British Thermal Units (Btu)

One therm = 100,000 Btu

English decathlon ‘ten-event sports competition’

 English decennial ‘occurring every ten years or lasting ten years’

English decennium ‘period of ten years’

 English dekagram ‘ten grams’

English dekaliter ‘ten liters’

English dekameter ‘ten meters’

English Dewey Decimal System, universal book classification system used in libraries

English dodeca, combination form meaning ‘having twelve’

English dodeca derives from Indian Sanskrit dwa ‘two’ + dasha ‘ten’.

English dodecaphonic ‘having twelve sounds’

English dodecagon ‘plane figure with twelve sides’

English dodecahedron ‘solid figure with twelve faces’

English Dodecanese ‘group of twelve Greek islands’

English duodecimal ‘number system with 12 as base’

English duodecimal derives from Indian Sanskrit dwa ‘two’ + dasha ‘ten’.

English duodecimally, adverb of duodecimal

English duodecimo ‘twelve page book’

English hexadecimal ‘number system with 16 as base’

English hexadecimally, adverb of hexadecimal

Indian Sanskrit dasha to English dec to Greek deka yields the following Greek words.

In all Greek words listed below d is pronounced soft as in this.

deka, dekada, dekas ‘ten’

dekadikus ‘decimal’

dekaenea ‘nineteen’

dekaex, dekaeksi ‘sixteen’

 

dekaepta ‘seventeen’

We will see in number 7 how Indian Sanskrit sapta becomes Greek epta ‘seven’ by dropping

the first s sound of Sanskrit. Likewise Spanish siete ‘seven’ drops the p sound of Sanskrit.

 

dekaetirida ‘tenth anniversary’

dekaetis ‘ten-year’

dekaetia ‘decade’

dekakis ‘ten times’

dekalogos ‘Ten Commandments also called the Decalogue’

dekameris ‘of ten parts’

dekaimeron ‘ten-day period’

 

dekaliro ‘tenner’

dekaocto ‘eighteen’

We will see in number 8 how Indian Tamil ettu becomes English eight, German acht and

Greek octo.

 

dekapentharia ‘about fifteen’

dekapentasillavos ‘fifteen syllable line’

dekapentoogosto ‘first fifteen days in August’

 

dekapente ‘fifteen’ 

We will see in number 5 how Indian Sanskrit pancha ‘five’ becomes Greek pente ‘five’.

 

dekaplasi/os ‘tenfold’

dekara ‘coin worth ten lepta’

lepta is Greek currency.

 

dekariko ‘coin worth ten drachmas’

drachma is Greek currency.

 

dekatesares ‘fourteen’

dekatessera ‘thirteen’ 

dekatessetis ‘tenth’

dekato ‘tenth’

 

dekatreis ‘thirteen’

We will see in number 3 how Indian Sanskrit thri ‘three’ becomes Russian tri, English three and Latin/Greek tria.

 

dekatria, dekatris ‘thirteen’

 

dekahronos ‘ten-year’

dekemvrios ‘December’ 

 Some Interesting Historical and Linguistic Facts

In the old Roman calendar September was the seventh month (from Indian Sanskrit sapta ‘seven’).

 October was the eighth month (from Indian Tamil ettu ‘eight’).

 November was the ninth month (from Indian Sanskrit nava ‘nine’).

 In 45 B.C. the old Roman calendar was replaced by the Julian calendar with 12 months and 365 days.

***

English Decalogue means ‘Ten Commandments’ given to Moses by God. The Greek word logos

derives from Indian Sanskrit loach ‘language’ which derives from Indian Tamil choll ‘say’.

It is easy to see that Indian Sanskrit loach (l-ch sounds) is mirror image of Indian Tamil choll

(ch-l sounds). ch and g are called sibilant (related) sounds. They are freely interchanged.

Thus Greek logos = Indian Sanskrit loach

Indian Sanskrit loach and Greek logos lead to Spanish lengua ‘tongue’and final English word language.

*** 

 Expanded parts on individual numbers coming up very soon

Origins of Other Numbers in India 

Russian nool, nol, Spanish nulo, French nul, nulle , German null and English null from Indian Sanskrit nihil

Russian odin, German ein and English one from Indian Tamil onrru ‘one’

Russian dva, dve, Polish dwa , Latin/English duo, Greek dio and Spanish dos  from Indian Sanskrit dwa ‘two’

Russian tri , Spanish tres, French trios, English three and Greek tria, treis from Indian Sanskrit thri ‘three’

Russian chetyre , Latin quat(t)uor, Spanish cuatro and English quarter from Indian Sanskrit chathur ‘four’

Latin/English penta, Greek pente from Indian Sanskrit pancha ‘five’

Russian shesht , Spanish seis, German sechs and English six from Indian Sanskrit sasha ‘six’

Latin septem, Spanish siete, Greek epta and even English seven from Indian Sanskrit sapta ‘seven’

Indian Hindi/Urdu aatt, English eight, German acht and Greek octo from Indian Tamil ettu ‘eight’

 Spanish neuve and English nine from Indian Sanskrit nava ‘nine’ 

These simple facts are there to see and hear.

Language started in India.

Contact us:

rangiranganath@yahoo.com

habbakkuk@gmail.com

kmguru@hotmail.com

 

To see our other articles about the origin of language in India click below

www.geocities.com/kmguru2000/Ignorance.doc 

www.wordorigins.wordpress.com

 

www.originsofwords.blogspot.comCc: 

To view our book One People One Language click below

www.authorsonline.co.uk/viewbook.php?bid=419

To view our book Real Roots of German, Greek, Latin and English click below

www.authorsonline.co.uk/viewbook.php?bid=510

a, the first letter (contd…)

Word Origins

Dedicated to finding real origins of words in several languages
Edition 6

abstemious
not over enjoying, like food and drink

Origins
German ab ‘away’, ‘down’
Latin ab ‘away’, ‘off’
Indian Sanskrit stha ‘remain’, ‘stay’

Mechanism
ab + Indian Sanskrit stha = English abstain ‘stay away’
abstemiuous is adjective.of abstain

abstemiously
See abstain
abstemiously
is adverb of abstain

abstemiousness
See abstain
abstemiousness
is noun of abstain.

abstention
See abstain
abstention
is noun of abstain.

abstentionism
See abstain
abstention
is another noun of abstain.

abstinence

See abstain
abstinence
is noun of abstain.

abstinent

See abstain
abstinent
is adjective of abstain.

abstinently
See abstain
abstinently
is adverb of abstain.

abundance
plenty

Origins
Indian Sanskrit a ‘not’
Indian Sanskrit band ‘bound’, ‘tied’

 Mechanism
Indian Sanskrit a + band = English abundance ‘not bound’, ‘plenty’

abundant
See abundance
abundant
is adjective of abundance.

abundant in
having plenty
See abundance
abundant
is adjective of abundance

abundantly
See abundance
abundantly
is adverb of abundance

abuse
oral abuse, to use foul language

Origins
Indian Sanskrit prefix a ‘not’
Indian Sanskrit bhaasha ‘language’

Mechanism
Thus Indian Sanskrit a + bhaasha = English abuse

abused
one who is abused
See abuse

abuser
one who abuses
See abuse

abusive
insulting, offensive
See abuse
abusive
is adjective of abuse.

abusively
See abuse
abusively
is adverb of abuse.

abusiveness
See abuse
abusiveness
is noun of abuse.

See our previous edition
https://wordorigins.wordpress.com/2006/12/22/hello-world/

Contact us
rangiranganath@yahoo.com
habbakkuk@gmail.com
kmguru@hotmail.com

See our other articles and books http://www.geocities.com/kmguru2000/Ignorance.doc
OPOL: http://www.authorsonline.co.uk/viewbook.php?bid=419
Roots: http://www.authorsonline.co.uk/viewbook.php?bid=510

a, the first letter (contd)..

Word Origins 

Dedicated to finding real origins of words in several languages

Edition 5 

absent without leave (AWOL) 

Origins

German ab ‘away’, ‘down’

Latin ab ‘away’, ‘off’

Indian Sanskrit stha ‘remain’, ‘stay’

Indian Sanskrit vina ‘without’

Mechanism

  ab + Indian Sanskrit stha = English abstain ‘stay away’

abstain leads into absentIndian Sanskrit vinaa becomes English without 

absinth/absinthe

strong liqueur

Origin

Arabic afsinteen 

absolute alcohol

Ethyl alcohol with less than 1% water by weight

Origins

English absolute ‘complete’, ‘perfect’

Arabic al ‘the’

Indian Tamil kall ‘vineous liqueur’

Mechanism

Arabic al + Indian Tamil kall = German der Alkohol, English alcoholEnglish absolute + Arabic al + Indian Tamil kall = English absolute alcohol 

absolute magnitude

astronomical term for magnitude of stars

Origins

English absolute ‘complete’, ‘perfect’

Indian Tamil makaa ‘big’

Mechanism

One Indian Tamil consonant has both k and g sounds.

Thus Indian Tamil makaa becomes Latin and  English mega.

magnitude derives from mega.

 English absolute + magnitude (from Indian Tamil makaa) = English absolute magnitude 

Similarities between Indian Tamil and German sound pronounciations

One Indian Tamil consonant has both k and g sounds.

One Indian Tamil consonant has both t and d sounds.

German follows the same practice.

.

German der Tag ‘day’ is pronounced as der Taak

German rund ’round’ (from Indian Tamil undai ‘sphere’)  is pronounced as runt.

 absolute majority

Origins

English absolute ‘complete’, ‘perfect’

Indian Tamil makaa ‘big’

Mechanism

 Indian Tamil consonant sound k becomes h sound in other languages.

Eg: Indian Tamil mukam ‘face’, Indian Sanskrit mukham ‘face’, Indian Hindi/Urdu muh ‘face’, Arabic muhayyam ‘face’

Indian Tamil vikkal ‘cough’, Greek viho ‘cough’

Spanish g and j have h sound.

Eg. Spanish Jose is pronounced as Hose.

Spanish gente ‘people’ is pronounced as hente.

Thus Indian Tamil makaa becomes Latin and  English major

majority derives from mega.

Interesting Fact

Many cold and cough medicines begin with the manufacturer’s name Vicks, from Indian Tamil vikkal ‘cough’.

 absolute value

 magnitude of a quantity regardless of sign (like positive or negative)

Origins

English absolute ‘complete’, ‘perfect’

Indian Tamil vilai ‘value’

  

Mechanism

Indian Tamil vilai becomes English value. Both have v-l sounds.

 Thus English absolute + English value (from Indian Tamil vilai) = English absolute value 

 absolute zero

 Temperature at which molecular activity stops

Origins

English absolute ‘complete’, ‘perfect’

Arabic sifir ‘zero’

Mechanism

Arabic sifir becomes English cipher and zero. c and z are sibilant (related sounds).

 Thus English absolute + English zero (from Arabic sifir) = English absolute zero 

absorb

 take in, suck up

Origins

English prefix ab ‘do’

Arabic zurb ‘suck up’

Mechanism

Thus English ab + Arabic zurb  = English absorb 

absorbance

See absorb 

absorbed

See absorb 

absorbent

See absorb 

absorber

See absorb 

absorbing

See absorb 

absorptance

See absorb 

absorption

See absorb 

absorption spectrum

See absorb 

abstain 

Origins

German ab ‘away’, ‘down’

Latin ab ‘away’, ‘off’

Indian Sanskrit stha ‘remain’, ‘stay’

Mechanism

  ab + Indian Sanskrit stha = English abstain ‘stay away’

 abstainer

See abstain

 See our previous edition

https://wordorigins.wordpress.com/2006/12/22/hello-world/

  Contact us

rangiranganath@yahoo.com 

habbakkuk@gmail.com 

kmguru@hotmail.com  

See our other articles and books 

http://www.geocities.com/kmguru2000/Ignorance.doc

 OPOL: http://www.authorsonline.co.uk/viewbook.php?bid=419 

 Roots: http://www.authorsonline.co.uk/viewbook.php?bid=510   

 

a, the first letter….contd

Word Origins 

Dedicated to finding real origins of words in several languages

Edition 4 

able 

Origin

Indian Tamil balam ‘strength’

Mechanism

     a + Indian Tamil balam = English able 

 

above

Origin

Indian Hindi/Urdu oopar ‘on top of’, ‘higher’,’above’

The Transition

English over derives from Indian Hindi/Urdu oopar .

Thus ab + over (from oopar) = English above.

 above board

open, without any concealment

Origin

See above 

above ground 

Origin

See above 

above mentioned 

Origin

See above 

abp

abbreviation for archbishop ‘head bishop’

Origins

Indian Tamil arachan ‘king’

English bishop ‘supervisor of local churches’

  

Mechanism

Indian Tamil arachan + English bishop = English archbishop 

Abraham

First patriarch mentioned in the Bible

Founder of Hebrew nation

Origins

Indian God Brahma “Creator God’

Intermediate

Indian Urdu/Arabic Ibrahim

Ancestor of Arab people

 Abraham’s bosom

heaven

Origin

See Abraham 

Abram

Ancient name of Abraham 

Origins

See Abraham 

absent

missing, not in place

Origins

Latin prefix ab ‘away’, ‘off’

Indian Sanskrit stha ‘remain’

Mechanism

Latin ab + Indian Sanskrit stha = English absent

 absentee vote

Vote by mail due to being away from your polling station

Origins

English absent (see absent for its origins)

Indian Tamil vayndu ‘want’

Mechanism

One Indian Tamil consonant has both d and t sounds.

So Indian Tamil vayndu can be pronounced as vayntu.

Thus Indian Tamil vayntu becomes English want and vote (cast your ballot for person or issue you want)

Thus English absent + Indian Tamil vayntu = English absentee vote

 absentminded 

Origins

English absent (see absent for its origins)

Indian Tamil manam ‘mind’

Indian Sanskrit manas ‘mind’

Mechanism

Thus English absent + Indian manam/manas = English absentminded

 absentmindedness 

Origin

See absentminded 

See our previous edition

https://wordorigins.wordpress.com/2006/12/22/hello-world/

  Contact us

rangiranganath@yahoo.com

habbakkuk@gmail.com 

kmguru@hotmail.com 

 See our other articles and books 

http://www.geocities.com/kmguru2000/Ignorance.doc

OPOL: http://www.authorsonline.co.uk/viewbook.php?bid=419

 Roots: http://www.authorsonline.co.uk/viewbook.php?bid=510   

 

a, the first letter….contd

                                                                   Word Origins 

                                Dedicated to finding real origins of words in several languages

                                                                           aag

Indian Hindi/Urdu word meaning ‘fire’

Origin

Indian Sanskrit Agni ‘god of fire’

Related Words

  Russian ogon ‘fire’

Latin ignis ‘fire’

English words like ignite, ignition etc.

aah

exclamation word in most languages

Origin

                                                                 Indian Tamil aaka 

The Transition

Indian Tamil k sound becomes h sound in Indian Sanskrit, Hindi/Urdu, Arabic and other European languages.

Eg.: Indian Tamil mukam ‘face’ = Indian Sanskrit mukham ‘face’= Indian Hindi/Urdu muh ‘face’ = Arabic muhayyam ‘face’.

Indian Tamil k sound becomes h sound in Indian Sanskrit and g sound in Latin and English.

Eg.: Indian Tamil makaa ‘big’ = Indian Sanskrit mahaa ‘big’= Greek megalos ‘big’ =Latin/English mega ‘big’.

                                                                        aardvark

South African name for anteater, often called ‘earth pig’

Origin Words

Arabic ard ‘earth’

Indian Sanskrit varaaha ‘boar’

Related Word

                                                             German derErdferkel 

How does Indian Sanskrit varaaha become South African vark?

Sanskrit varaaha has v-r-h sounds.

Indian Tamil k sound becomes h sound in Indian Sanskrit, Hindi/Urdu, Arabic and other European languages.

Eg.: Indian Tamil mukam ‘face’ = Indian Sanskrit mukham ‘face’= Indian Hindi/Urdu muh ‘face’ = Arabic muhayyam ‘face’.

Thus South Afrcan vark = Indian Sanskrit varaaha.

                       Arabic ard + South African vark (from Sanskrit varaaha) = aardvark 

How does South African vark become German ferkel part of der Erdferkel?

German v has f sound.

Eg. German Volk is pronounced as Folk.

Thus South African vark (from Indian Sanskrit varaaha) = German ferkel part of Erdferkel.Arabic ard + German ferkel (from South African vark from Sanskrit varaaha) = German der Erd

                                                                           ab

Arabic word meaning ‘water’

Origin

Indian Sanskrit apa ‘water’

 

Explanation

                                 Arabic has no p sound. So Indian Sanskrit apa becomes Arabic ab 

Other Related Words

                                                                   Latin aqua

Indian p sound becomes k sound.

                                     Spanish aguaIndian p sound becomes g sound 

                                                                       abandon 

Origin Words

Indian Sanskrit prefix a- ‘not’

Indian Sanskrit bandh ‘bond’, ‘tie’

Related Words

German das Abhandkommen ‘loss’

                                                    Spanish abandonerEnglish abandon 

Mechanism

                                               All words derive from the union of a + bandh

abba

Popular Jewish first name

Origins

Indian Tamil appa ‘father’

Explanation

One Indian Tamil consonant has both p and b sounds.

                                                So Indian Tamil appa = Jewish abba abbess 

Origins

Indian Tamil appa ‘father’

Explanation

One Indian Tamil consonant has both p and b sounds.

                                                 So Indian Tamil appa = English abbot

English abbess is the feminine version of abbot.

                                                                         abbey

                                        English word meaning ‘home of the abbot or abbess’ 

abbot

Origins

Indian Tamil appa ‘father’

Explanation

One Indian Tamil consonant has both p and b sounds.

                                              So Indian Tamil appa = English abbot abed

means ‘in bed’

Origin Words

English prefix a ‘in’

Indian Tamil padu ‘lie down’

Indian Tamil padukkai ‘bed’

Mechanism

One Indian Tamil consonant has both p and b sounds.

Thus Indian Tamil padu can be pronounced as badu.

Thus English a + Indian Tamil badu = English abed.

                                                                      abound

English word meaning ‘plenty ‘

Origin Words

Indian Sanskrit prefix a- ‘not’

Indian Sanskrit bandh ‘bind’, ‘bound’

Mechanism

              Indian Sanskrit a + Indian Sanskrit bandh = English abound  See our previous edition

https://wordorigins.wordpress.com/2006/12/22/hello-world/

                                                                   Contact us

                                   rangiranganath@yahoo.com

                                   habbakkuk@gmail.com

                                   kmguru@hotmail.com  

                                              See our other articles and books 

http://www.geocities.com/kmguru2000/Ignorance.doc

OPOL: http://www.authorsonline.co.uk/viewbook.php?bid=419

                                Roots: http://www.authorsonline.co.uk/viewbook.php?bid=510   

a, the first letter

                                                            Word Origins

Dedicated to finding real origins of words in several languages

                                                                            A, a

Very first letter in all European languages

Origin

a is the first letter in all Indian languages. All have one case.

A, a is the first letter in Russian. It has upper and lower cases.

 

The Transition

From Indian a to Arabic alif (1700 B.C), Hebrew aleph (circa 1700 B.C), Phoenician  aleph (1600 B.C) and Greek Alpha (800 B.C)

back to Roman and English A, a

 

Indian spoken sounds are tens of thousands of years old. Their age is based on the cave art and paintings at Altamira, Fort de Gaume, Les Trois Freres and Lascaux near the Pyrenees Mountains and Willendorf in Austria. Some of the findings at Lascaux Cave have been Carbon-14 dated to be 15,000 years old. Carbon-14 method is good for determining age upto70, 000 years.


Pyrenees Mountains are located in Western Europe between France and Spain. Basque people speaking an ancient language called euskara, French and Spaniards live in the  vicinity of these mountains. We will show that all the above languages, euskara, Spanish and French have origins in India. Most linguists call euskara an ‘isolate’ language meaning that it is not related to any language on our earth. That is because they never looked at Indian languages.

More on Carbon-14 dating in Carbon

A, a

Very first vowel in all European languages

 

Origin

a is the first vowel in all Indian languages

long aa is the second vowel in all Indian languages

 

a

ending to indicate feminine nouns

Origin

Most Indian feminine names end in a

Examples

Radha

Sita

Suchitra

This practice is followed in most languages

Arabic Ayisha

Hebrew Sara

German Monika

Greek Thea

English Barbara

 

A, a

meaning ‘one’

 

Origin

Indian Sanskrit eka ‘one’

 

English

Sanskrit ka is dropped resulting in plain a 

 

a

symbol for old units of measurement are and ares, modern acre

 

                                                                           Origin

Indian Tamil ayr ‘plough’

a-

English prefix meaning ‘not’ as in apolitical ‘not political’

 

Origin

Indian Sanskrit prefix a- ‘not’

 

Examples

Indian Sanskrit a- ‘not’ + Indian Sanskrit mrt ‘death’ = Indian Sanskrit amrit ‘elixir’

Indian Sanskrit a- ‘not’ + Indian Sanskrit surah ‘God’ = Indian Sanskrit asurah ‘demon’, ‘not God’

 

Comments

Indian Sanskrit amrit ‘elixir’ is the origin for Italian Amaretto, a popular liqueur. 

a  (preposition)

meaning ‘per’

 

Example

English ‘ten cents a dance’

Origin

Indian Sanskrit eka ‘one’

 

English

Sanskrit ka is dropped resulting in plain a 

See our previous edition

https://wordorigins.wordpress.com/2006/12/22/hello-world/

 

Contact us

rangiranganath@yahoo.com

habbakkuk@gmail.com 

kmguru@hotmail.com

See our other articles and books 

http://www.geocities.com/kmguru2000/Ignorance.doc

 

OPOL: http://www.authorsonline.co.uk/viewbook.php?bid=419

 

Roots: http://www.authorsonline.co.uk/viewbook.php?bid=510

Word Origins

                               Word Origins                                  

Dedicated to finding real origins of words in several languages

Introduction

We have published two books, ‘ One People One Language” and “Real Roots of German, Greek, Latin & English-Mini Word Origin Directory” to clean up the behemoth linguistic morass created by ignorant linguists and their minions.

Please learn about this morass at

http://www.geocities.com/kmguru2000/Ignorance.doc

So we have created this blog to clean up this behemoth linguistic morass.

For today that’s enough. Soon we will start with expansions and excerpts from our 2nd book, starting with the origins of letters starting with A. Eventually we will end up with letters starting with Z.

Let’s have fun.

Contact us

rangiranganath@yahoo.com

habbakkuk@gmail.com

kmguru@hotmail.com

See our other articles and books

http://www.geocities.com/kmguru2000/Ignorance.doc

 

OPOL: http://www.authorsonline.co.uk/viewbook.php?bid=419

 

Roots: http://www.authorsonline.co.uk/viewbook.php?bid=510

 

 

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.